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325 West Gaines Street, Suite 514  ·  Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400  ·  Phone: 850-245-0503  ·  Fax: 850-245-9530

 Model for District Add-On Reading Endorsement Program

K-12 Reading Endorsement

  1. Program Title:

    District XYZ Add-on Program for K-12 Reading Endorsement

  2. Program Rationale and Purpose

    Five years ago, District XYZ County began a study of reading in the District.  One of the major outcomes was a training program for primary teachers and later, prekindergarten teachers. This study also brought about a keen awareness of the needs in secondary reading and the lack of resources in that area. That awareness developed into an intensive focus in the area of secondary reading, especially struggling readers. The impetus for this focus on reading included information gathered during the study as well as:

    • increasing awareness of school and student needs in the area of reading
    • state FCAT reading requirements for promotion and graduation
    • use and availability of Lexile scores for all students
    • increased use of data by teachers
    • growing awareness of need by parents
    • FCAT Data

    District Needs

    As a result, District XYZ changed its Student Progression Plan (SPP) to require

    • a reading course for all 6th graders,
    • addition of reading specialists at the high school,  and
    • a reading elective for all AIP Reading students, grades 6-9.

    The changes in the SPP have brought about major changes in curriculum offerings and master schedules. Each school will need at least 3 teachers (total of 72) with reading expertise to effectively offer the classes. Statewide, only 3% of teachers are certified/endorsed in the area of reading, and District XYZ's own percentages mirror the State's.  Expertise in reading is becoming a critical shortage area; in fact, reading has been declared a critical teacher shortage area in Florida.  The K-12 reading endorsement has been approved in order to increase capacity for high quality reading instruction for struggling readers.

    Benefit to Teachers

    Recognizing the lack of preparation of secondary teachers to address the area of reading and the minimum preparation of many elementary teachers to teach reading, District XYZ began a three-year CRISS (Creating Independence through Student-Owned Strategies) initiative specifically geared toward the content classrooms and helping students to be successful with two of the five major reading components: reading comprehension and reading vocabulary. This initiative is in its third year. (In 2000, District XYZ had only 3 CRISS trainers; at the end of May, more than 50 school-based CRISS trainers will be able to offer CRISS on a continuing basis to their staff.)

    Still, the majority of teachers teaching Intensive Reading are out of field.

    This year District XYZ has established Lead Literacy Teams at each of the secondary schools. The purpose of these teams is to assess areas of need, establish a plan for improvement, and monitor the plan--making changes when and where necessary based upon evidence and analysis of student data results and alignment activities of Florida’s Reading Program Specifications.  (Reading committees have been in place at the elementary level for several years.)

    An indication of District XYZ's need for reading expertise is shown by the overwhelming response of teachers to the Florida Online Reading Professional Development course that aligns with competency 2 of the reading endorsement.  More than 260 teachers registered for the 6 sections offered in District XYZ

    In addition to providing teachers with the opportunity to add an endorsement, program credit may be used to extend the Florida Educator’s Certificate.  In addition to these certification advantages, staff members benefit from participation in a systematic program of competency development that will result in improved student performance.  The emphasis in District XYZ is that to help students be successful:

    • each teacher must support reading in each class
    • teachers that are responsible for the intensive reading classes need reading expertise.

    Benefit to Students

    Students will certainly benefit from the courses taught by qualified reading teachers in each of the 24 secondary schools.  However, these students need support in each content area class to be successful in school and, particularly, struggling readers need daily intensive support in an intensive reading class.                                                                                        .

    The FCAT data (see below) revealed that at all levels anywhere from 40 to 65 percent of the students currently read at Levels 1 and 2, and these students must have additional support from qualified teachers if they are to have a successful experience in school and meet exit criteria. 

    Although District XYZ has begun several initiatives in the area of reading, to meet the needs of the students and the teachers, a systematic plan of courses that can be offered in an expeditious manner is needed.  Such courses comprise the Reading Endorsement Program, based on the best practices and knowledge in the areas of Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Comprehension, Vocabulary and Fluency.  The courses will include overviews, diagnostics as well as other reliable and valid instructional assessments, data analysis, strategies to build each of the five major reading components for increasing student reading development, and a practicum with continuous feedback to encourage teacher growth/proficiency in their knowledge and skills in reading.

  3. Program Content/Curriculum

    The inservice program will focus on topics of study for each of the six competencies that were developed to align with the text rule approved by State Board Rule 6A-4.0292–Specialization Requirements for Certification in Reading (Grades K-12).

    The reading endorsement competencies were developed by the Department of Education and involved the specialized expertise of Reading Supervisors of Florida (RSP), Council of Language Arts Supervisors  (CLAS), District Reading & Language Arts Supervisors, Florida Reading Association (FRA), Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR), FlaRE Center personnel, Reading and ESOL Crosswalk Committee, and some public university partners. The district has added objectives that further address the competencies and reflect competencies defined by the International Reading Association.  The following six competencies and 73 indicators have been identified by the State for the Reading Endorsement Program.  (An additional 3 indicators added by the District are marked**.)  In keeping with the State’s system, those marked  “*” are reading endorsement competencies specific to the competencies for English to Speakers of Other Languages; those marked “R” are specific to the competencies for Reading Certification; those marked “E” are specific to Exceptional Student Education.   Those marked “RD” are competencies recommended by the International Reading Association.

    1. Reading Competencies

      Foundations in Language & Cognition

      1. Identify and apply basic concepts of phonology as they relate to language development and reading performance (e.g., phonological processing, inventory of phonemes, phonemic awareness skills, phonemic analysis). *
      2. Distinguish both phonological and phonemic differences in language and their applications in written and oral discourse patterns (e.g., language & dialect differences). *
      3. Identify structural patterns of words as they relate to reading development and reading performance (e.g., inventory of orthographic representations, syllable conventions; spellings of prefixes, root words, affixes).  *
      4. Apply structural analysis to words (e.g., orthographic analysis, spelling morphologies, advanced phonics skills).
      5. Identify the principles of reading fluency as they relate to reading development
      6. Understand the role of reading fluency in development of the reading process.
      7. Identify and apply principles of English morphology as they relate to language acquisition (e.g., identify meanings of morphemes, inflectional and derivational morphemes, morphemic analysis). *
      8. Identify principles of semantics as they relate to vocabulary development (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, figurative language, etc.).
      9. Identify principles of syntactic function as they relate to language acquisition and reading development (e.g., phrase structure, types of sentences, sentence manipulations).*
      10. Understand the impact of variations in written language of different text structures on the construction of meaning.
      11. Identify cognitive task levels and the role of cognitive development in the construction of meaning of a variety of texts (e.g., knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation).
      12. Understand the transactive nature of the reading process in constructing meaning from a wide variety of texts and for a variety of purposes (e.g., text connections: within texts, across texts, from text to self, from text to world).
      13. Identify language characteristics related to informal language and cognitive academic language. *
      14. Identify phonemic, semantic, and syntactic variability between English and other languages.  *
      15. Understand the interdependence between each of the major reading components and their effect upon fluency in the reading process (e.g., reading rate: phonological processing and construction of meaning).
      16. Understand the interdependence between each of the major reading components and their effect upon comprehension (e.g., construction of meaning: vocabulary, fluency).
      17. Understand the impact of dialogue, writing to learn, and print environment upon reading development.

      Foundations of Research-Based Practices

      1. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development of phonemic analysis of the sounds of words (e.g., phonemic blending, segmentation).  *
      2. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development from emergent through advanced phonics with words from both informal and academic language (e.g., orthographic skills, phonetic and structural analysis: rules, patterns, and generalizations).
      3. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding fluency development and reading endurance (e.g., rereading, self-timing, independent reading material, reader’s theater).
      4. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding vocabulary and concept development (e.g., common morphological roots, morphemic analysis, system of word relationships, semantic mapping, semantic analysis, analogies).
      5. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development of comprehension skills and cognition (e.g., key questioning strategies such as reciprocal teaching, analysis of relevance of details, prediction, “think-aloud” strategies, sentence manipulation, paraphrasing).
      6. Identify comprehensive instructional plans that synchronize the major reading components (e.g., a lesson plan: structural analysis, morphemic analysis, reciprocal teaching, rereading) including technology-based practices.
      7. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plan for scaffolding content area vocabulary development and reading skills (e.g., morphemic analysis, semantic analysis, reciprocal teaching, writing to learn).
      8. Identify resources and research-based practices that create language-rich and print-rich environments  (e.g., large and diverse classroom libraries; questioning the author; interactive response to authentic reading and writing tasks).
      9. Identify research-based guidelines and selection tools for choosing literature and expository text appropriate to students’ interests and independent reading proficiency.

      Foundations of Assessment

      1. Describe or recognize appropriate test formats and types of test items for assessing the major elements of reading growth: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension.  
      2. Understand the role of assessment in planning instruction to meet student learning needs. R
      3. Interpret students’ formal and informal test results.  R, E
      4. Identify measurement concepts and characteristics and uses of norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests.   R
      5. Understand the meaning of test reliability and validity, and describe major types of derived scores from standardized tests. 
      6. Demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics, administration, and interpretation of both quantitative and qualitative instructional assessments (to include each of the following: screening, diagnosis, progress monitoring, and outcome measures) including technology-based assessment tools.
      7. Analyze data to identify trends that indicate adequate progress in student reading development.  RD
      8. Understand how to use data to differentiate effective instruction (grouping strategies, intensity of instruction: ii vs. iii).
      9. Understand how to interpret data with application of instruction that matches students with appropriate level of intensity of intervention (in whole class, small group, one-to-one), with appropriate curricular materials, and with appropriate strategies. E
      10. Identify appropriate criteria for selecting materials to include in portfolios for monitoring student progress over time.   R, E
      11. Identify interpretive issues that may arise when English language tests are used to assess reading growth in LEP students. *
      12. Identify reading assessment techniques appropriate for diagnosing and monitoring reading progress of LEP students and students with disabilities in the area of reading. * E
      13. Communicate effectively results of assessment to individuals and groups.  R D

      Foundations of Differentiation

      1. Identify the characteristics of both language and cognitive development and their impact on reading proficiency.
      2. Compare language, cognitive, and reading acquisition of different age groups (primary, intermediate, secondary levels) and abilities.  *
      3. Identify language acquisition characteristics of learners from mainstream, exceptional, and diverse populations.  *
      4. Identify stages of reading development for diverse learners, including mainstream students, LEP students and students with disabilities.
      5. Identify common difficulties in development of each of the major reading components.
      6. Understand specific appropriate reading accommodations for students with exceptional needs and LEP students.
      7. Identify principles of differentiating instruction for all students in mainstream classes, including students with disabilities in reading and LEP students.  *
      8. Identify strategies effective and more skilled readers use for word recognition and comprehension in contrast to those strategies used by beginning and/or struggling readers.R
      9. Identify a wide range of curriculum materials in research-based effective reading instruction for learners at various stages of decoding and writing development and different cultural and linguistic backgrounds.  R D
      10. Select appropriate materials that address cultural and linguistic differences.  *
      11. Identify structures and procedures for monitoring student reading progress.

      Application of Differentiated Instruction

      1. Apply knowledge of scientifically based reading research in each of the major reading components as it applies to reading instruction (e.g., phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension).
      2. Apply research-based practices and materials for preventing and accelerating both language and literacy development. R
      3. Identify techniques for scaffolding instruction for children having difficulty in each of the five major components of reading growth.
      4. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing students’ phonemic awareness.
      5. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing students’ phonics skills and word recognition.  R
      6. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing students’ reading fluency, automaticity, and reading endurance.
      7. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing both general and specialized content area vocabulary.  R
      8. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing students’ critical thinking skills   R
      9. Apply research-based instructional practices for facilitating reading comprehension. R
      10. Apply knowledge of language to instruction in working with LEP students who are at different levels of oral proficiency. *
      11. Apply instructional strategies to facilitate students’ metacognitive skills in reading. R, E
      12. Identify reliable and valid assessment procedures to validate instructional applications. E
      13. Identify and set goals for instruction and student learning based on assessment results to monitor student progress.

      Demonstration of Accomplishment

      1. Apply knowledge of language development, literacy development, and assessment to instructional practices. R
      2. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for developing students’ phonemic awareness.
      3. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for developing phonics skills and word recognition.  R
      4. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for developing reading fluency, automaticity, and reading endurance.
      5. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based practices for developing both meaningful and specialized content area vocabulary.  R
      6. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for facilitating reading comprehension).       
      7. Demonstrate knowledge of instruction to facilitate students’ metacognitive efficiency in reading.  R, E
      8. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for developing critical thinking and content area reading skills.  R.
      9. Demonstrate knowledge of goal setting and monitoring of student progress with appropriate instructional application that promotes increases in student learning trends in reading over time.
      10. Demonstrate knowledge of differentiating instruction for all students in mainstream classes, including students with disabilities in reading and LEP students.  *
      11. Demonstrate instructional skill in working with LEP students that are at different levels of oral proficiency. *
      12. Demonstrate knowledge of creating both language-rich and print-rich environments.

      For each of the topics of study, participants of the District XYZ County Add-on Reading Endorsement Certification Program must demonstrate competency of a minimum of 80% of the course objectives to receive final inservice credit for each corresponding competency.  Since the add-on certification is field-based and the reading endorsement is competency-based, participant engagement in clinical activities are an integral part of District XYZ’s add-on program for the reading endorsement. Specific clinical activities include each of the following:

      • clinical interviews with students
      • administration of reliable and valid instructional reading assessments to include screening, diagnosis, and progress monitoring
      • data analysis of student reading assessment results
      • identification of source of student reading difficulties
      • application of appropriate instructional practices
      • monitoring of student reading progress with reliable and valid assessment tools and practices
      • action research activities
      • analysis of different student reading profiles
    2. Specialization/Professional Studies

      Professional studies competencies necessary for the professional development of all staff are included with listed competencies and are an integral part of the required body of knowledge.   Included in the approved competencies are indicators requiring pedagogical, theoretical, and practicum studies.

    3. Nationally Recognized Guidelines

      Guidelines other than those listed by the State for the K-12 Reading Endorsement (including Specialization Requirements for Certification in Reading, Grades K-12; Certification requirements for Exceptional Student Education; Specialization Requirements for Adding English for Speakers of Other Languages Endorsement to a Florida Teaching Certificate) were consulted.  Such guidelines include Standards for Reading Professionals, International Reading Association; 2003 Standards for Reading Professionals (Draft), International Reading Association; and Report of the National Reading Panel.  Each of these guidelines were used in the selection of topics of study; program design; specific course content, objectives, and necessary resources; and professional development activities, including clinical activities. 

  4. Instructional Design and Delivery
    1. Instructional Strands

      The instructional strands for the reading endorsement add-on program are listed in the chart below:

      Component # Inservice Points Component Title
      01-013-006 60 Reading Foundations in Language & Cognition
      01-013-007 60 Reading Foundations of Research-Based Practices
      01-013-008 60 Reading Foundations of Assessment
      01-013-009 60 Reading Foundations & Applications of Differentiated Instruction
      01-013-010 60 Reading Demonstration of Accomplishment (Practicum)
        TOTAL: 300 points  
    2. Training Components
      1. Title
        Reading Foundations in Language & Cognition
      2. Abbreviated Title
        Reading Language & Cognition
      3. Status
        New
      4. Department Sponsor
        Professional Development Office
      5. Component Coordinator
        Professor Higgins
      6. Eligible Participants
        Administrators
        Instructional Staff
        School Related Personnel
      7. Inservice Points
        60 points; this is the sole offering for competency 1: Foundations in Language & Cognition
      8. Competencies Addressed
        Instructional and Administration:
        Knowledge of Foundational Reading Subject Matter: the five major reading components and their interdependence in student reading development
        School Related Personnel:
        Development of Specific Skills or Competencies
      9. Primary Purpose
        Add-on Certification
      10. Primary Delivery Method
        Workshop
      11. Followup
        Participant Product
      12. Overall Goal
        One of 5 component offerings leading to reading endorsement (K-12), this component is designed to provide teachers seeking reading endorsement with an understanding of reading as a process of student engagement in both fluent decoding of words and construction of meaning.
        Upon successful completion of this component, participants seeking reading endorsement will be able to demonstrate through small group, on-site demonstration and projects, portfolios, products, and participation in supervised practice with peers, substantive knowledge of language structure and function and cognition for each of the five major components (phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency) of the reading process.
      13. Specific Objectives
        The participant will:
        1. Identify and apply basic concepts of phonology as they relate to language development and reading performance (e.g., phonological processing, inventory of phonemes, phonemic awareness skills, phonemic analysis)
        2. Distinguish both phonological and phonemic differences in language and their applications in written and oral discourse patterns (e.g., language & dialect differences) *
        3. Identify the principles of reading fluency as they relate to reading development
        4. Identify principles of semantics as they relate to vocabulary development (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, figurative language)
        5. Identify principles of syntactic function as they relate to language acquisition and reading development (e.g., phrase structure, types of sentences, sentence manipulations)*
        6. Identify cognitive task levels and the role of cognitive development in the construction of meaning of a variety of texts (e.g., knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation)
        7. Understand the transactive nature of the reading process in constructing meaning from a wide variety of texts and for a variety of purposes (e.g., text connections: within texts, across texts, from text to self, from text to world)
        8. Identify language characteristics related to informal language and cognitive academic language. *
        9. Identify phonemic, semantic, and syntactic variability between English and other languages.  *
        10. Understand the impact of dialogue, writing to learn, and print environment upon reading development.
        11. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development of comprehension skills and cognition (e.g., key questioning strategies such as reciprocal teaching, analysis of relevance of details, prediction, “think-aloud” strategies, sentence manipulation, paraphrasing)
        12. Identify resources and research-based practices that create language-rich and print-rich environments (e.g., large and diverse classroom libraries; questioning the author; interactive response to authentic reading and writing tasks)
        13. Describe or recognize appropriate test formats and types of test items for assessing the major elements of reading growth:  phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension.
        14. Identify the characteristics of both language and cognitive development and their impact on reading proficiency.
        15. Identify strategies effective and more skilled readers use for word recognition and comprehension in contrast to those strategies used by beginning and/or struggling readers.
        16. Select appropriate materials that address cultural and linguistic differences. *
      14. Activities
        1. Attend lectures and discussions on:

          1. Stages of development in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension
          2. Specific linguistic differences in articulation, vocabulary, and syntax across cultures and languages; discuss their impact on student reading development
          3. Interdependence of the major reading components and the impact of each on student reading development
        2. View modeling of specific phoneme articulation and the multisensory features; practice independently and in small groups; model articulation for students previously identified with phonemic awareness difficulties
        3. Write brief papers on such topics as vocabulary of expository texts and features of metacognition for discussion in class or in a learning community
        4. Develop comprehension questions for a corresponding text; map the comprehension questions to scaffold across the scope of cognitive skill levels
        5. Conduct clinical interviews with students to begin a portfolio of different reading profiles
      15. Evaluation
        Pre/Post Test
        Informal Group Assessment
        Rubric/Checklist for Performance/Product Based Assessment
        Observation by Peer or Colleague
        Participant Portfolio
        Other  (Demonstrate the acquisition of all required competencies of each approved program component of the add-on program)

        Note:  Participants who will use the inservice credit earned through participation in this component to add an endorsement to a certificate or to extend a certificate will demonstrate all the specific objectives of the component as determined by pre- and posttest or other valid measures and will complete any other assessment procedures required by the instructor.

      16. Assist Participant
        Examples of PDP Strategies
        Evaluation Student Work or Behavior
        Analysis of Student Performance Measures
        Other
      17. Approved for ESOL Capstone
        Yes
      18. Assess Component
        The District will track the number of participants, number dropped for non-performance, and number of program completers.  Participants will be surveyed to determine the extent to which quality of instruction, curriculum, and assessment meets their needs.  Site-based evaluations will determine the extent to which school and program needs are being met, acquired skills are practiced in the classroom and shared with others, and implementation is cost and time efficient/effective.

      1. Title
        Reading Foundations of Research-Based Practices
      2. Abbreviated Title
        Reading Resrchd Pract
      3. Status
        New
      4. Department Sponsor
        Professional Development Office
      5. Component Coordinator
        Professor Higgins
      6. Eligible Participants
        Administrators
        Instructional Staff
        School Related Personnel
      7. Point Range
        60 points; this is the sole offering for competency 2: Foundations of Research-Based  Practices
      8. Competencies Addressed
        Instructional
        Knowledge of Subject Matter
        Planning for Instruction
        Delivery of Instruction
        Classroom Managemen
        School Related Personnel
        Development of Specific Skills or Competencies
      9. Primary Purpose
        Add-on Certification
      10. Primary Delivery Method
        Workshop
      11. Followup
        Participant Product
      12. Overall Goal:
        One of 5 components leading to reading endorsement (K-12), this component is designed to provide teachers seeking reading endorsement with an understanding that the responsibility of reading instruction   is to build the reading process for student engagement in both fluent decoding of words and construction of meaning.
        Upon successful completion of this component, participants seeking reading endorsement will through small group, on-site projects and demonstration, portfolios, products, and participation in supervised practice with peers, understand the principles of scientifically based reading research as the foundation of comprehensive instruction that synchronizes and scaffolds each of the major components of the reading process toward student mastery.
      13. Specific Objectives
        The participant will:
        1. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development of phonemic analysis of the sounds of words (e.g., phonemic blending, segmentation)  *
        2. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development from emergent through advanced phonics with words from both informal and academic language (e.g., orthographic skills, phonetic and structural analysis: rules, patterns, and generalizations)
        3. Identify structural patterns of words as they relate to reading development and reading performance (e.g., inventory of orthographic representations, syllable conventions; spellings of prefixes, root words, affixes) *
        4. Apply structural analysis to words (e.g., orthographic analysis, spelling morphologies, advanced phonics skills)
        5. Understand the role of reading fluency in development of the reading process
        6. Identify and apply principles of English morphology as they relate to language acquisition (e.g., identify meanings of morphemes, inflectional and derivational morphemes, morphemic analysis) *
        7. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding fluency development and reading endurance (e.g., rereading, self-timing, independent reading material, reader’s theater)
        8. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding vocabulary and concept development (e.g., common morphological roots, morphemic analysis, system of word relationships, semantic mapping, semantic analysis, analogies)
        9. Understand the impact of variations in written language of different text structures on the construction of meaning.
        10. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plans for scaffolding development of comprehension skills and cognition (e.g., key questioning strategies such as reciprocal teaching, analysis of relevance of details, prediction, “think-aloud” strategies, sentence manipulation, paraphrasing)
        11. Identify comprehensive instructional plans that synchronize the major reading components (e.g., a lesson plan: structural analysis, morphemic analysis, reciprocal teaching, rereading) including technology-based practices
        12. Identify explicit, systematic instructional plan for scaffolding content area vocabulary development and reading skills (e.g., morphemic analysis, semantic analysis, reciprocal teaching, writing to learn)
        13. Understand the interdependence between each of the major reading components and their effect upon fluency in the reading process (e.g., reading rate:  phonological processing and construction of meaning)
        14. Understand the interdependence between each of the major reading components and their effect upon comprehension (e.g., construction of meaning: vocabulary, fluency)
        15. Identify resources and research-based practices that create language-rich and print-rich environments (e.g., large and diverse classroom libraries; questioning the author; interactive response to authentic reading and writing tasks)
        16. Identify research-based guidelines and selection tools for choosing literature and expository text appropriate to students’ interests and independent reading proficiency. 
      14. Activities
        1. Attend lectures and discussions on:
          1. Research-based instructional practices for phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension
          2. Research-based instructional modifications for Limited English Proficient (LEP) and Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students; discuss their impact on reading development
          3. How to scaffold reading instruction
        2. View modeling of specific research-based instructional practices for each of the five major reading components (i.e., reciprocal teaching for comprehension); practice delivery of each practice in a learning community
        3. Write lesson plans for each of the research-based instructional practices that were viewed and practiced
        4. Deliver a lesson in each of the research-based instructional practices to students previously identified for difficulties in the corresponding component; write a reflective paper of the differences in students’ instructional needs for a portfolio; videotape a lesson delivery
        5. Develop comprehension questions for a corresponding content area text; map the comprehension questions and scaffold the use of graphic organizers across the scope of cognitive skill levels as part of a comprehension lesson plan
        6. Conduct an individual study to investigate such research-based practices as Questioning the Author
        7. Tutor a student in reading
      15. Evaluation
        Pre/Post Test
        Informal Group Assessment
        Rubric/Checklist for Performance/Product Based Assessment
        Observation by Peer or Colleague
        Participant Portfolio
        Other (Demonstrate the acquisition of all required competencies of each approved program component of the add-on program)

        Note:  Participants who will use the inservice credit earned through participation in this component to add an endorsement to a certificate or to extend a certificate will demonstrate all the specific objectives of the component as determined by pre- and posttest or other valid measures and will complete any other assessment procedures required by the instructor.

      16. Assist Participant
        Examples of PDP Strategies
        Evaluation Student Work or Behavior
        Analysis of Student Performance Measures
        Other
      17. Approved for ESOL Capstone
        No
      18. Assess Component
        The District will track the number of participants, number dropped for non-performance, and number of program completers.  Participants will be surveyed to determine the extent to which quality of instruction, curriculum, and assessment meets their needs.  Site-based evaluations will determine the extent to which school and program needs are being met, acquired skills are practiced in the classroom and shared with others, and implementation is cost and time efficient/effective. 


      1. Title
        Reading Foundations of Assessment
      2. Abbreviated Title
        Reading Assessm Fndtn
      3. Status
        New
      4. Department Sponsor
        Professional Development Office
      5. Component Coordinator
        Professor Higgins
      6. Eligible Participants
        Administrators
        Instructional Staff
        School Related Personnel
      7. Point Range
        60 points; this is the sole offering for competency 3: Foundations of Assessment
      8. Competencies Addressed
        Instructional and Administration
        Knowledge of Subject Matter
        Planning for Instruction
        Assessment of Student Performance
        Communication
        School Related Personnel
        Development of Specific Skills or Competencies
      9. Primary Purpose
        Add-on Certification
      10. Primary Delivery Method
        Workshop
      11. Followup
        Participant Product
      12. Overall Goal
        One of 5 components leading to reading endorsement (K-12), this component is designed to provide teachers seeking reading endorsement with an understanding of the administration and interpretation of reliable and valid instructional assessments in order to better prevent, identify, and remediate reading difficulties.
        Upon successful completion of this component, participants seeking reading endorsement will through small group, on-site projects and demonstrations, portfolios, products, and participation in supervised practice with peers, be able to select, administer, score, and interpret a variety of instructional assessments (formal and informal), organize the data, and use the data to guide instruction and monitor progress of all students.
      13. Specific Objectives
        The participant will:
        1. Describe or recognize appropriate test formats and types of test items for assessing the major elements of reading growth:phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension.
        2. Understand the role of assessment in planning instruction to meet student learning needs.
        3. Interpret students’ formal and informal test results.
        4. Identify measurement concepts and characteristics and uses of norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests.
        5. Understand the meaning of test reliability and validity, and describe major types of derived scores from standardized tests.
        6. Demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics, administration, and interpretation of both quantitative and qualitative instructional assessments (to include each of the following: screening, diagnosis, progress monitoring, and outcome measures).
        7. Analyze data to identify trends that indicate adequate progress in student reading development.
        8. Understand how to use data to differentiate instruction (grouping strategies, intensity of instruction: ii vs. iii)
        9. Understand how to interpret data with application of instruction that matches with appropriate level of intensity of intervention (in whole class, small group, one-to-one), with appropriate curricular materials, and with appropriate strategies.
        10. Identify appropriate criteria for selecting materials to include in portfolios for monitoring student progress over time.
        11. Identify reading assessment techniques appropriate for diagnosing and monitoring reading progress of LEP students and students with disabilities in the area of reading.
        12. Apply knowledge of language development, literacy development, and assessment to instructional practices.
      14. Activities
        1. Attend lectures and discussions on:
          1. Different types of assessments
          2. Psychometric standards for reliability and validity
          3. The role of assessment in planning and validating instruction
          4. Appropriate use of instructional reading assessments
        2. Write a brief paper on such topics as characteristics of different assessments to discuss in class or a learning community
        3. View modeling of administration of a reliable and valid reading diagnostic; read and discuss the administration procedures and measures; practice administering
        4. View modeling of administration of a reliable and valid screening and progress monitoring assessment; discuss the administration procedures and measures; practice administering
        5. Practice interpretation of a variety of assessment results that include screening, diagnostics, and progress monitoring assessments
        6. Administer assessments to conduct a case study; write a reflective paper with interpretive results
      15. Evaluation
        Pre/Post Test
        Informal Group Assessment
        Rubric/Checklist for Performance/Product Based Assessment
        Observation by Peer of Colleague
        Video Tape/Audio Tape
        Participant Portfolio
        Written Action Plan for Follow up and Application on the Job
        Student Lesson Plan
        Other(Demonstrate the acquisition of all required competencies of each approved program component of the add-on program)

        Note:Participants who will use the inservice credit earned through participation in this component to add an endorsement to a certificate or to extend a certificate will demonstrate all the specific objectives of the component as determined by pre- and posttest or other valid measures and will complete any other assessment procedures required by the instructor.

      16. Assist Participant
        Examples of PDP Strategies
        Rubrics for Evaluation Student Work or Behavior
        Analysis of Student Performance Measures
        Other
      17. Approved for ESOL Capstone
        No
      18. Assess Component
        The District will track the number of participants, number dropped for non-performance, and number of program completers.Participants will be surveyed to determine the extent to which quality of instruction, curriculum, and assessment meets their needs.Site-based evaluations will determine the extent to which school and program needs are being met, acquired skills are practiced in the classroom and shared with others, and implementation is cost and time efficient.


      1. Title
        Reading Foundations and Applications of Differentiated Instruction
      2. Abbreviated Title
        Reading Differn Inst
      3. Status
        New
      4. Department Sponsor
        Professional Development Office
      5. Component Coordinator
        Professor Higgins
      6. Eligible Participants
        Administrators
        Instructional Staff
        School Related Personnel
      7. Point Range
        60 points; this is the sole offering for competency 4 and 5: Foundations and Application of Differentiated Instruction
      8. Competencies Addressed
        Instructional
        Knowledge of Subject Matter
        Planning for Instruction
        Delivery of Instruction
        Assessment of Student Performance
        Classroom Management
        School Related Personnel
        Development of Specific Skills or Competencies
      9. Primary Purpose
        Add-on Certification
      10. Primary Delivery Method
        Workshop
      11. Followup
        Participant Product
      12. Overall Goal
        One of five components for reading endorsement (K-12), this offers understanding of how to prescribe, differentiate instruction, and use appropriate strategies and materials based upon scientifically based research to address the prevention, identification, and remediation of reading difficulties to increase performance.
        Upon successful completion of this component participants will through small group, on-site projects and demonstrations, portfolios, products, and participation in supervised practice with peers, be able to demonstrate a broad knowledge of students from differing profiles, including students with disabilities and from diverse populations; they will know instructional research-based methodology to prevent reading difficulties and accelerate progress for struggling students.
      13. Specific Objectives
        Foundations of Differentiation
        The participant will:
        1. Identify the characteristics of both language and cognitive development and their impact on reading proficiency.
        2. Compare language, cognitive, and reading acquisition of different age groups (primary, intermediate, secondary levels) and abilities.*
        3. Identify language acquisition characteristics of learners from mainstream, exceptional, and diverse populations.*
        4. Identify stages of reading development for diverse learners, including mainstream students, LEP students and students with disabilities.
        5. Identify common difficulties in development of each of the major reading components.
        6. Understand specific appropriate reading accommodations for students with exceptional needs and LEP students.
        7. Identify principles of differentiating instruction for all students in mainstream classes, including students with disabilities in reading and LEP students.*
        8. Identify strategies effective and more skilled readers use for word recognition and comprehension in contrast to those strategies used by beginning and/or struggling readers.
        9. Identify a wide range of curriculum materials in research-based effective reading instruction for learners at various stages of decoding and writing development and different cultural and linguistic backgrounds.
        10. Select appropriate materials that address cultural and linguistic differences.*
        11. Identify structures and procedures for monitoring student reading progress
        Application of Differentiated Instruction
        1. Apply knowledge of scientifically based reading research in each of the major reading components as it applies to reading instruction (e.g., phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension).
        2. Apply research-based practices and materials for preventing and accelerating both language and literacy development.
        3. Identify techniques for scaffolding instruction for children having difficulty in each of the five major components of reading growth.
        4. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing students’ phonemic awareness.
        5. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing students’ phonics skills and word recognition.
        6. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing students’ reading fluency, automaticity, and reading endurance.
        7. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing both general and specialized content area vocabulary.
        8. Apply research-based instructional practices for developing students’ critical thinking skills
        9. Apply research-based instructional practices for facilitating reading comprehension.
        10. Apply knowledge of language to instruction in working with LEP students who are at different levels of oral proficiency. *
        11. Apply instructional strategies to facilitate students’ metacognitive skills in reading.
        12. Identify reliable and valid assessment procedures to validate instructional applications.
        13. Identify and set goals for instruction and student learning based on assessment results to monitor student progress.
      14. Activities
        1. Attend lectures and discussions such as:
          1. Different student reading profiles across the grade levels
          2. Flexible grouping for differentiated instruction
          3. Diverse student populations and instructional accommodations
          4. Write a brief paper to discuss in class or a learning community with such topics as principles of differentiated instruction
        2. View modeling of effective reading instruction for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students, Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students, and Academic Improvement Plan (AIP) students; discuss in a small group; write a reflective paper
        3. Develop a differentiated lesson plan for a diverse class of students with varying reading needs
        4. Conduct case studies with Limited English Proficient (LEP), Exceptional Student Education (ESE), or Academic Improvement Plan (AIP) students based upon reliable and valid assessment data results
        5. Deliver three differentiated reading lessons based on reliable and valid assessment results to a small group of students, including Limited English Proficient (LEP), Exceptional Student Education (ESE), or Academic Improvement Plan (AIP) students
        6. Conduct an individual study to investigate such practices as multisensory instruction
        7. Tutor a student in reading
      15. Evaluation
        Pre/Post Test
        Informal Group Assessment
        Rubric/Checklist for Performance/Product Based Assessment
        Observation by Peer or Colleague
        Participant Portfolio
        Other(Demonstrate the acquisition of all required competencies of each approved program component of the add-on program)
        Note:Participants who will use the inservice credit earned through participation in this component to add an endorsement to a certificate or to extend a certificate will demonstrate all the specific objectives of the component as determined by pre- and posttest or other valid measures and will complete any other assessment procedures required by the instructor.
      16. Assist Participant
        Examples of PDP Strategies
        Evaluation Student Work or Behavior
        Analysis of Student Performance Measures
        Other
      17. Approved For ESOL Capstone
        No
      18. Assess Component
        The District will track the number of participants, number dropped for non-performance, and number of program completers.Participants will be surveyed to determine the extent to which quality of instruction, curriculum, and assessment meets their needs.Site-based evaluations will determine the extent to which school and program needs are being met, acquired skills are practiced in the classroom and shared with others, and implementation is cost and time efficient/effective.

      1. Title
        Reading Demonstration of Accomplishment (Practicum)
      2. Abbreviated Title
        Reading Practicum
      3. Status
        New
      4. Department Sponsor
        Professional Development Office
      5. Component Coordinator
        Professor Higgins
      6. Eligible Participants
        Administrators
        Instructional Staff
        School Related Personnel
      7. Point Range
        60 points; this is the sole offering for competency 6: demonstration of accomplishment
      8. Competencies Addressed
        Instructional
        Knowledge of Subject Matter
        Planning for Instruction
        Delivery of Instruction
        Assessment of Student Performance
        Classroom Management
        School Related Personnel
        Development of Specific Skills or Competencies
      9. Primary Purpose
        Add-on Certification
      10. Primary Delivery Method
        Workshop
      11. Followup
        Participant Product
      12. Overall Goal:
        One of 5 components leading to reading endorsement (K-12), this component is a supervised practicum providing participants seeking reading endorsement with practical experience in providing evidence of increases in student reading performance with the prescription and utilization of appropriate strategies and materials based upon scientifically based reading research to address the prevention, identification, and remediation of reading difficulties.
        Upon successful completion of this component, participants seeking reading endorsement will apply knowledge of reading development to reading instruction with sufficient evidence of increased student reading proficiency for struggling students, including students with disabilities and students from diverse populations.
      13. Specific Objectives
          The participant will:  
        1. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for developing students’ phonemic awareness.
        2. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for developing phonics skills and word recognition.
        3. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for developing reading fluency, automaticity, and reading endurance.
        4. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based practices for developing both meaningful and specialized content area vocabulary.
        5. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for facilitating reading comprehension.
        6. Demonstrate knowledge of instruction to facilitate students’ metacognitive efficiency in reading.
        7. Demonstrate knowledge of research-based instructional practices for developing critical thinking and content area reading skills.
        8. Demonstrate knowledge of goal setting and monitoring of student progress with appropriate instructional application that promotes increases in student learning trends in reading over time.
        9. Demonstrate knowledge of differentiating instruction for all students in mainstream classes, including students with disabilities in reading and LEP students.*
        10. Demonstrate instructional skill in working with LEP students who are at different levels of oral proficiency. *
        11. Demonstrate knowledge of creating both language-rich and print-rich environments.
      14. Activities
        This is a supervised practicum that is ongoing over a course of 10 weeks.Throughout this timeframe and under the guidance of a supervisor with reading expertise, the participant will be engaged in clinical experiences and will be responsible for each of the following:
        • Identifying a specified number of students for case study, each with instructional needs in different reading components, through the use of reliable and valid screening and diagnostic assessment results
        • Developing comprehensive lesson plans that align with the reading instructional needs of each of these students based upon reliable and valid reading assessment results
        • Tracking reading development of these students throughout this timeframe using valid measures
        • Generating valid evidence of gains in reading proficiency of these students
        Under supervision of the designee, the participant will be expected to maintain a clinical portfolio and to document both assessment and instructional activities throughout the duration of the 10 weeks.The supervisor will evaluate the clinical portfolio for each of the following:
        • Appropriate use and interpretation of all instructional assessments
        • Appropriate application of reading instruction based upon assessment data results
        • Application of appropriate differentiated instruction to meet diverse student reading needs
        • Appropriate use of reading resources and strategies
        • Appropriate and sufficient amount and quality of items included in the clinical portfolio
        • Collective evidence of student reading gains
      15. Evaluation
        Pre/Post Test
        Clinical Portfolio
        Other(Literacy Log)
        Other(Demonstrate the acquisition of all required competencies of each approved program component of the add-on program)

        Note:Participants who will use the inservice credit earned through participation in this component to add an endorsement to a certificate or to extend a certificate will demonstrate all the specific objectives of the component as determined by pre- and posttest or other valid measures and will complete any other assessment procedures required by the instructor.

      16. Assist Participant
        Examples of PDP Strategies
        Evaluation Student Work or Behavior
        Analysis of Student Performance Measures
        Other
      17. Approved for ESOL Capstone
        No
      18. Assess Component
        The District will track the number of participants, number dropped for non-performance, and number of program completers.Participants will be surveyed to determine the extent to which quality of instruction, curriculum, and assessment meets their needs.Site-based evaluations will determine the extent to which school and program needs are being met, acquired skills are practiced in the classroom and shared with others, and implementation is cost and time efficient/effective.

    3. Competency Demonstration Matrix

      Competency Number Component Number Specific Indicator (DOE) Specific Objective Number Method of Competency Demonstration
      1









      2

      3
      4



      50734900/
      1013010














      1.A.1
      1.A.2
      1.C.1
      1.D.2
      1.E.1
      1.E.3
      1.E.4
      1.F.1
      1.F.2
      1.F.5
      2.E
      2.F.3
      3.11
      4.1
      4.8
      4.9
      1
      2
      3
      4
      5
      6
      7
      8
      9
      10
      11
      12
      13
      14
      15
      16
      Project/class discussion
      Project, Test
      Test
      Clinical interview
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion/test
      Product/class discussion /test
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      1




      2



      1

      2
      50730900/
      1013006








      1.B.1,
      1.B.2,
      1.C.2.
      1.D.1,
      1.E.2,
      2A,
      2B
      2C,
      2D, 2E
      1.F.3
      1.F.4
      2F1, 2F4
      2F3, 2F4
      2F1, 2F2
      3
      4
      5
      6
      9
      1
      2
      7
      8,10
      13
      14
      11,12
      15, 16
      11, 12

      Clinical interview
      Field Experience
      Product/class discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/class discussion/Literacy Log
      Project/class discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/class discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/class discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/Reflection paper
      Micro teach
      Product/class discussion/literacy Log
      Observation/class presentation
      Product/Micro teach
      Product
      Product
      Product/class discussion
      Product/class discussion
      Investigation of Practice
      3









      3
      6
      50732900/
      1013008











      3.1, 3.2,3.3
      3.4,
      3.8
      3.6, 3.7, 3.9, 3.11
      3.4, 3.5,
      3.6,
      3.9,
      3.9, 3.10
      3.6,3.9,
      6.1
      1
      2,3,
      4
      8
      6, 7
      9,11
      4, 5
      6
      9
      9,10
      6,9
      12
      Clinical Interview
      Field Experience
      Product/micro teach/Literacy Log
      Product
      Product
      Diagnostic assessment Project/instructional lesson
      Product
      Class discussion/reflection
      Presentation
      Critique of content area/picture book
      Case study
      Case Study
      4











      5
      5073390/
      1013009












      4.1,4.2, 4.5
      4.1, 4.6, 4.7
      4.1, 4.5
      4.2, 5.3,
      4.3, 4.4, 4.7
      4.8,
      4.9
      4.10
      4.11
      5.9, 5.12
      5.7
      5.11
      5.10
      5.9, 5.3
      5.1, 5.2, 5.4,5.5, 5.6, 5.8, 5.11, 5.13
      1,2,
      5
      1,6
      7
      1,5
      2.3
      3,4,
      7
      8,9
      10
      11
      12
      20, 23
      18
      22
      21
      20,14
      12,13
      15,16
      17,19
      22
      24
      Case Study
      Project
      Project/presentation
      Group presentation
      Reflective journal
      Group discussion/presentation
      Group discussion/presentation
      Report
      Report
      Product
      Product
      Product
      Product/Learning Log
      Reflection
      Field Experience
      Case Studies
      Investigation of Practice
      Group discussion/presentation
      Product
      Instructional lesson/reflection
      Product/group discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/group discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/group discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/group discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/group discussion/Literacy Log
      Product/group discussion/Literacy Log
      6 50733900/
      1013009
      6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.9
      6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.6, 6.7
      6.1, 6.9
      6.5,
      6.8, 6.11
      6.5, 6.6, 6.8,6.11
      6.7, 6.9
      6.10,6.12
      1,2
      3,4
      5,9
      2,3
      4,5
      6,7.
      1.9
      5
      8,11
      5,6
      8,11
      7,9
      10,12
      Clinical Portfolio w/Case Studies
      Case study
      Case study
      Product – strategy kit
      Product – strategy kit
      Product – strategy kit
      Product – strategy kit
      Product – Assessment package
      Project, Product – Strategy Kit
      Micro teach
      Video tape/peer observation
      Project
      Reflection
      Product/literacy log

    4. Instructors

      Instructors are reading specialists employed by the District XYZ County School Board, persons contracted by an institution of higher education, and/or highly qualified staff members or other instructor approved by the district.  An instructor must hold a masters degree in reading or have completed the five required courses for the reading endorsement; should have a minimum of three years successful experience as a reading specialist or in a comparable reading/leadership position, must have successful experience as a district trainer, and must have a recommendation from his/her principal and from the Professional Development Office Supervisor responsible for elementary or secondary reading.

  5. Completion Requirements

    1. Program Completion

      Satisfactory completion of individual components for add-on certification purposes may be demonstrated through:

      1. Instructor’s verification of successful demonstration of all applicable competencies and products within the component;

      2. Verification of successful demonstration of all applicable competencies within the component by means of approved Master Inservice Plan component from another district where the component is part of an approved Reading (K-12) Endorsement Program in that district and where reasonable equivalency between the components can be established through a review of the component objectives (Florida Online Reading Professional Development serves as the introductory component in the program); or

      3. Official transcript from a college or university documenting successful completion of a course the catalog description of which establishes a reasonable equivalence to the District component.

    2. Competency Demonstration

      All those attempting to add the reading endorsement to their Florida Educator’s Certificates must earn a minimum of 300 inservice points by successfully completing the prescribed set of inservice components including the demonstration of all competencies required for the endorsement or through documented equivalent means. In general, competency demonstration will be done through projects, products, tests, classroom demonstrations, and/or portfolios; however, procedures for evaluation of competency achievement within components will vary depending on the nature of the competency. These variations are outlined in the Competency Demonstration Matrix (pp. 26-27).   Although conventional written tests may be used for assessing knowledge and understanding of concepts, participants are expected to build a portfolio and maintain a learning log throughout the training program.  Inservice training credits for those completing the add-on program will be awarded on the basis of a candidate’s successful completion of the components’ 208 hours of direct instruction and 92 hours of practicum and follow-up activities.  When feasible, some of the direct instruction may be substituted with on-line or other technology-based alternatives as designed and developed by the District.

    3. Competency Verification

      Verification of competencies other than through the procedures stated above is not an option for the reading endorsement program. Certificates will be issued to successful completers as a record of competency completion. 

  6. Program Evaluation

    1. Evaluation Plan

      Program assessment techniques, training components, and competency acquisition by individual participants will be used to evaluate the reading endorsement program. Methods by which the component coordinator will determine successful completion of individual participants are described for each component. 

      • Individual participants will be evaluated on the basis of their having acquired the necessary competencies as verified by the instructor in accordance with approved methods and criteria.
      • Participants, using district staff development program procedures, will evaluate each training component.
      • The program may be assessed by participants, instructors, staff development personnel, district reading supervisory staff, principals, or school-level reading specialists to determine program effectiveness and program efficiency in terms of management, operation, delivery, and cost effectiveness. 
      • Methods by which the component coordinator will determine the impact of the component on the individual’s job performance and/or classroom, school, or work setting are described as part of the each component evaluation.
      • Impact of more qualified and trained teachers on student performance will be investigated.
      • Data described below will be reviewed and analyzed.

      Descriptive Data

      • Number of teachers who are out-of-field in reading.
      • Number and percentages of out-of-field that have enrolled in the add-on program.
      • Number of enrollees dropped for non-performance.
      • Number and percentage of program completers. 

      Client Satisfaction Data
      Attitudes of candidates will be surveyed to determine the extent to which:

      • The program is meeting candidate needs.
      • The quality of instruction is consistent with professional development standards.
      • The curriculum is pertinent to their classroom and professional development needs.
      • The pace, quantity, and quality of assessments are compatible with their primary teaching responsibilities.

      Supervisory Evaluation Data

      • The add-on certification program is meeting school and program needs.
      • Skills acquired in add-on training are practiced in the classroom and shared with others.
      • Evidence exists of tangible benefits to students accruing from add-on training.
      • Implementation of the program is cost and time effective.

  7. Management

    The Department of Curriculum and Instructional Services will be responsible for the overall management of the add-on program. The Secondary Language Arts Supervisor will establish and coordinate inservice training for the endorsement program.

    1.   Candidate application and admission

      The offices of Teaching and Learning, Curriculum and Instructional Services, Human Resources, and Information Services will share the process for application, admission, and verification of the Reading Endorsement Program.  Eligibility to participate in the program is predicated on a candidate’s holding a valid Florida Professional or Temporary Certificate based upon a bachelor’s degree or higher with certification in an academic, degreed vocational, administrative, or specialty class coverage, and being currently employed by the School District.

      A candidate who enters the program based on a temporary certificate must show proof of eligibility for a Professional Certificate prior to the district’s verification of completion of the program.  Permanent substitutes with valid full-time Florida Temporary or Professional Education Certificates are eligible to enroll in the program.

      Each applicant will receive a copy of the Add-On Certification Program, and orientation will be provided.  Each applicant will meet with the Director of Human Resources or designee and complete a Plan of Study that will be signed by both the office of Human Resources and applicant to signify agreement.

      Continuing advisement will be provided by the appropriate district office personnel on matters related to certification add-on offerings, training requirements, and progress toward completion of the Reading Endorsement Program. 

      The Teaching and Learning Office, Office of Human Resources, and Professional Development Office will ensure that staff members are available to assist candidates with the initial program orientation, the development of a Plan of Study, inservice training information, and follow-up advisement for successful program completion. 

    2. Attendance

      Attendance is mandatory unless because of serious illness or extreme emergency the instructor excuses the absence. Excused absence class hours must be satisfied through a schedule approved by the instructor. 

    3. Transfer and utilization of credit (college or inservice)

      Equivalent or higher content level college credit from a regionally accredited institution of higher education may be used to satisfy component requirements.  College course(s) are converted to inservice points with each semester credit hour equivalent to 20 inservice points.  An official college transcript must be requested by the participant and forwarded to the office of Human Resources.

      Inservice credit earned in other school districts may be applied to the reading endorsement program provided that (1) the component is of equivalent or higher content level, and (2) the component was earned as part of an approved Add-on Certification Program for Reading.  Participants must request an official Inservice Transfer Record be sent from the previous employer to Staff Development Director.

    4. Certification of Completion

      When participants have completed all program completion requirements thereby demonstrating mastery of competencies and objectives, program completion is verified.  The Director of Human Resources using data prepared by the Teaching and Learning Office and compiled by Information Services will verify successful completion of all components and notify the Department of Education.

  8. School Board Approval

    The District School Board of District XYZ County, Florida, has approved the above Reading Endorsement Certification Plan for personnel who will be adding the Reading Endorsement to their certificates. 

     

    ____________________________________                        ______________________________
    Mr. Ed U. Kator, Ph.D.                                                      Date
    Superintendent of Schools

     

    ____________________________________                        ______________________________
    Mrs. Ann Thusiasm                                                           Date
    Chairman of the Board